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112011 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 09 iZ17 • i RESOLUTION NO. 11,201 A RESOLUTION TO ADOPT A PERMANENT TREE PLANTING PLAN FOR THE CITY OF LITTLE ROCK AND ITS ENVIRONS; AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES. WHEREAS, the Little Rock Board of Directors ( "Board ") has recognized the importance of trees to the economic and aesthetic value and overall well -being of the community in Little Rock, Ark. Ordinance ( "LRO ") No. 18,362 (September 26, 2000), and WHEREAS, LRO 18,362 has been codified as Section 15 -37 of Article II Chapter 15 of Little Rock, Ark. Revised Code ( "LRC") (1988), and WHEREAS, pursuant to LRC Section 15 -37 (i), the Board created a T.R.E.E. Fund for the collection of in -lieu fees to be used for planting trees in City parks, rights -of -way, and other areas where a lack of foliage exists, and WHEREAS, the Ordinance provides that the Board shall adopt a permanent Tree Planting Plan for the City by December 31, 2001, and the Tree Planting Plan adopted by this resolution serves that purpose. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE CITY OF LITTLE ROCK ARKANSAS: Section 1. The BOD hereby adopts the following Tree Planting Plan for the City of Little Rock and its environs: Little Rock Urban Forestry Tree Planting Plan Planting Objectives Trees provide the community with a wide range of environmental, aesthetic and recreational benefits. It is the objective of this plan to provide guidelines for proper tree selection, planting and early establishment on City- managed properties within City of Little Rock. Further, this plan will ensure that the City will continue to enjoy the benefits of a healthy population of trees and associated landscape. The Tree Planting Plan and related materials may be modified as industry standards and 31 community needs dictate. 32 Planting Locations 33 Tree planting locations should be identified and selected based on a lack of adequate tree 34 canopy coverage. Planting locations should be selected to provide the maximum benefits of tree 35 canopy in providing shade, erosion control, screening and /or aesthetics. 1 Tree planting locations can be in City parks or public grounds, along roadways, easements or 2 other City- managed properties. Tree plantings may be conducted on private property adjacent to 3 City- managed property with consent of and in agreement with the owner. 4 Specific tree planting locations will be identified annually based on surveys completed by 5 appropriate City staff, through community input in conjunction with the Neighborhood Association 6 Urban Forestry grant program and in compliance with City ordinances. Non - prioritized targeted 7 areas for tree planting include: 8 1. Residential streets with less than one mature tree per 150 linear feet. 9 2. Existing commercial areas without street side landscaping or buffers. 10 3. Parking areas and sidewalks in the downtown Urban Use District. 11 4. City and neighborhood park picnic and playgrounds. 12 5. City street easements and medians. 13 T.R.E.E. Fund 14 An amendment to Article II of LRC Chapter 15 entitled "City Beautiful Commission" 15 created a fund to be used for the replenishment of trees in the City, called the "Tree Restoration for 16 Environmental Enhancement" (T.R.E.E.) fund. The T.R.E.E. fund shall consist of cash payments 17 of responsible parties, as defined in the ordinance, in -lieu of required tree improvements. These in- 18 lieu contribution funds shall be dedicated to planting and maintaining trees on public property and 19 rights -of -way within the area of the site where the trees were removed, as defined by section map, or 20 such other areas of the City that the Board of Directors shall authorize. 21 Tree Selection List 22 The attached Suggested Tree List should serve as a guide in the selection of tree species to be 23 planted. Although many wonderful tree species are available from local nurseries, the list provides a 24 selection of trees that has proven to be successful in the Little Rock area. The list provides the 25 common name of the tree, it's botanical name and a few comments about the tree's attributes to 26 consider during the selection process. 27 When planning a tree planting site it is important to select the "right tree for the right place." 28 Often a tree's aesthetic qualities are the dominating characteristic during the selection process. 29 However, since most trees can live to be 80 to 100 years old, mature size, growth habit and future 30 maintenance costs must be considered. Some examples of this include: 31 1. Trees with a mature height of more than 30 feet (Oak, Pine and others) should 32 not be planted near over -head utility lines. 33 2. Trees with low- hanging limbs (Pin Oak) should not be planted adjacent to 34 sidewalks, roadways or parking spaces. [2] 0 0 1 3. Trees with weak wood (Silver Maple) or poor branching structure (Bradford 2 Pear) should not be planted in areas susceptible to strong winds or ice 3 accumulation. 4 4. Trees with thin bark (Red Maple varieties) which are susceptible to frost cracks 5 should not be planted in areas with wide late winter temperature variations. 6 5. Trees with large, troublesome fruiting bodies (Sweetgum, Pine, Walnut) should 7 not be planted near pedestrian walkways. 8 Planting and Establishment Guidelines 9 Trees may be purchased in containers or ball and burlapped (B &B). Generally, 10 containerized trees are smaller in height and diameter but can be planted throughout the year except 11 in the drier, hotter months. B &B trees are larger in diameter and height, but because of the high 12 percentage of root loss during digging should only be planted during the dormant season. 13 Planting holes should be dug to create a saucer shaped hole to allow root expansion and 14 outward growth. Hole depth should be no deeper than necessary to allow the root collar and large 15 lateral roots to be place at, or one (1) inch above the existing grade. Hole width should be 2 to 3 16 times the diameter of the root ball or container. Remove all twine, burlap and wire basket material 17 completely, or at a minimum, from the top half of the root ball. Backfill the planting hole with the 18 original soil removed during digging. Soil amendments and fertilizer are not recommended at 19 planting. 20 The first three (3) years after planting is critical to tree survival and future growth. Water is 21 the most crucial factor in tree survival due to the limited root area of the young tree. Newly planted 22 trees should receive ten (10) to fifteen (15) gallons of water per week during the growing season, 23 either naturally or through a slow, soaking method which will saturate the soil in the root zone. 24 Adding a layer of natural, organic mulch such as woodchips, around the tree will help cool 25 the soil, reduce moisture loss, while eliminating weed and grass competition. Mulching around the 26 newly planted tree will also eliminate the need for weed eating or mowing near the base, which can 27 damage the bark causing permanent damage. The mulch should be layered three (3) inches deep 28 around the entire planting hole or to the dripline whichever is greater. Be sure to keep the mulch 29 away from the tree trunk to discourage insects and fungus growth. 30 Pruning should be done only to remove broken or rubbing limbs. Shaping the tree may be 31 done after the tree becomes well established. 32 Staking should be limited to the first year after planting and then only when tree size and 33 exposure make wind throw possible. 34 Fertilization should be limited, and then only after the first year of growth. The addition of 35 mycorrhizae, hydro gel and bio- stimulants may be used to aid in early root growth and tree survival 36 in urban soils. [3] • • 1 Section 2. The Tree Planting Plan may be amended from time to time by resolution of the 2 Board of Directors as deemed appropriate for the fulfillment of the goals and objectives of the tree 3 planting initiative of the City. 4 Section 3. Severability. In the event any title, section, paragraph, item, sentence, clause, 5 phrase, or word of this resolution is declared or adjudged to be invalid or unconstitutional, such 6 . declaration or adjudication shall not affect the remaining portions of the resolution which shall 7 remain in full force and effect as if the portion so declared or adjudged invalid or unconstitutional 8 was not originally a part of the resolution. 9 Section 6. Repealer. All laws, ordinances, resolutions, or parts of the same, that are 10 inconsistent with the provisions of this resolution are hereby repealed to the extent of such 11 inconsistency. 12 13 ADOPTED: December 18, 2061 14 15 ATTEST: 16 18 Nanck Woo(r City Clerk 19 20 APPROVED AS TO LEGAL FORM: 21 22 23 Thomas M. Carpenter, City Attorney [4] APPROVED: k Val Ji alley, Mayor